Covington Research Group

Department of Geosciences, University of Arkansas
Matt Covington
Assistant Professor
Department of Geosciences
University of Arkansas
216 Gearhart Hall
Fayetteville, AR 72701
work: +1 479-575-3876
fax: +1 479-575-3469
mcoving at uark.edu

(photo: Marcin Gala and Kasia Biernacka)
Google Scholar Profile

Principle Investigator



Matt Covington
Assistant Professor
PhD (Physics), University of California, Santa Cruz
BS (Physics), BA (Philosophy), University of Arkansas
Full CV

After completing a PhD in theoretical astrophysics, Covington combined his passion for caves and the outdoors with his fascination for mathematical models of physical processes. Now he studies a wide variety of hydrogeological and geomorphological processes, particularly in caves and karst terrains. (Photo on left by Jason Gulley.)



Graduate Students



Celia Trunz
PhD Student (2017-present)

Subglacial hydrology of the Greenland Ice Sheet.



Alex Breeding
MS Student (2016-present)

The influence of sandstone caprock on landscape evolution within the Buffalo River area.



Josue Rodriguez
MS Student (2015-present)
BS, Angelo State University

E Coli. dynamics in Blowing Springs Cave.


Holly Young
MS Student (2015-present)
BS, University of Arkansas (2015)

Carbon dioxide dynamics, cave airflow, and karst carbon budgets.


Chelsea Whetstine
MS Student (2014-present)
BS, Arkansas Tech (2014)

CO2 dynamics at the Savoy Experimental Watershed.



Max Cooper
PhD Student (2014-present)
MS, Mississippi State University (2014)
BS, SUNY New Paltz

Models of cave cross section evolution. Sediment transport and paragenesis in caves. Glaciated karst terrain of New York.




Undergraduate Students




Sarah Williams
BS Student (2015-present)

Carbon dioxide dynamics within the vadose zone at the Savoy Experimental Watershed.



Brandon Conlon
BS Student (2017-present)

Moulin life cycles on the Greenland Ice Sheet.



David O'Hearn
BS Student (2017-present)

Meltwater production and routing on the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet.



Spencer Wilbur
BS Student (2017-present)

Abrasion mill experiments on the relative importance of chemical and mechanical processes in eroding limestone.


Former Group Members




Hannah Gnoza
Currently - MS Student UC Denver
BS Student (2015-2017)

Dissolution experiments in Blowing Springs Cave to examine the relative importance of water chemistry and flow velocity.



Ginny Holcomb
Currently - Washington County GIS
MS Student (2014-2016)
BS, University of Arkansas (2014)

Influence of cave ecology and cave airflow patterns on carbon dynamics within a cave stream.


Katarina Kosič
Currently - Virginia Dept of Conservation and Recreation
Visiting PhD Student (2014-2016)
University of Nova Gorica, Slovenia

Karst aquifer management and conservation. Transboundary aquifers. Karst vulnerability mapping.


Evan Thaler
Currently - PhD student, UMass Amherst
Research technician (2015-2016)
MS, University of Arkansas (2015)
BS, University of Arkansas

Influence of rock solubility on bedrock channel morphology. Development of knickpoints in soluble rocks. Landscape evolution in the Buffalo River basin.



Joe Myre
Currently - Asst. Professor, Univ. of St Thomas
NSF Earth Sciences Postdoc (2013-2015)
PhD, University of Minnesota - Twin Cities (Computer Sci.)
BS, University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire

Computational fluid dynamics models of speleogenesis. 3D scanning of cave morphology using low cost technologies. Using arduinos for environmental data logging. website


Matija Perne
Currently - Researcher, Jo┼żef Stefan Institute
Postdoc (2013-2015)
PhD, University of Nova Gorica, Slovenia
BS, University of Ljubljana (Physics)

Models of cave cross-section evolution. Speleogenesis in open channel flow. Bedrock channel morphology and controls on steepness and width. Carrying heavy stuff in caves.


Kiefer Vaughn
Current - Project Geologist, SCS Engineers
MS Student (2012-2015)
BS, University of Arkansas - Little Rock (2012)

Carbon dioxide dynamics in karst springs. Understanding natural variability in limestone dissolution rates.